Bear vs. Bare: Definition, Meaning, Difference & Examples


Bear vs. Bare? Which is to choose? In English there are many confusing word pairs that almost sound and look similar but they mean something absolutely different. Understanding these words and their meaning can sometimes be very difficult.

But this is where this series of posts will come to your aid. After all, learning these words and their contextual meaning will only help you with your day-to-day conversation.

Bear vs. Bare: What is the Difference?

In this post, I will be telling you about “bear” vs. “bare” and the difference in their meaning.

From their etymological origin to their meaning, I am going to cover them all.

So, let’s get started.

BearBare
Bear is a verb that indicates to hold up or support something.  Bare is an adjective in English Grammar that indicates something that does not have covering or clothing
E.g., He has to bear the expenses.E.g., The room was bare of light.
Bear vs. Bare: What is the Difference

Origin Difference Between Bear vs. Bare

Bear Etymological Origin

The word came into the Old English from “beran”, which has a Germanic origin. Also, it has an Indo-European root from the Sanskrit “bharati”, the Greek “pherein”, and Latin “ferre”.

Bare Etymological Origin

The word comes from the Old English word “bær” (noun), “barian” (verb), which has a Germanic origin. It is also related to Dutch word “baar”.

Examples & Meaning Between Bear vs. Bare

What Does Bare Mean? Examples

Bare is an adjective in English Grammar that indicates something that does not have covering or clothing, something naked or nude.

Like, He was walking bare foot.

If you refer to space, then this word can mean a place without the usual furnishings, contents, etc.

It can also mean something absolutely unconcealed or undisguised or something plain.

  • E.g., The lawn was absolutely bare.

When used as a verb, it can mean as something open to view; reveal or divulge.

  • E.g., I learned to live with my bare scars.

Synonyms: Stark and barren.

What does Bear Mean? Examples

Bear is a verb that indicates to hold up or support something.

  • Like: The beams are bearing the weight of the whole structure.

It can also mean to stay firm under a heavy load.

  • Like: She was a working lady and she bears the whole expense of the household.

Some other familiar verb phrases are bear down, to bear off, to bear on, to bear out, to bear up, and to bear with.

Synonyms: stand and endure.

How To Use Bear vs. Bare?

When you wish to mean something that’s naked, exposed, or stark, then you must use bare.

But if you wish to refer to something sustaining, upholding, or supporting something, then you must use bear.

To avoid the confusion, you can think that as a verb, bare is always uncovering or revealing.

But what you are saying is not about exposing something, then just stick to bear.

Some examples can be,

  • I can’t bear to watch this.
  • The room was bare of light.
  • One can never know which of them can bear scrutiny
  • He was bare naked when he arrived at my doorsteps.
  • He always knew how to highlight the bare essentials of any story.

Some Questions and Answers for Bear vs. Bare

Question-1

  • Q. Who would want to (bear/bare) the responsibility for such an act?
  • Ans. Who would want to bear the responsibility for such an act?

Question-2

  • He (bear/bare) the pain alone as no one was there.
  • -> He bore the pain alone as no one was there

Question-3

  • I saw a (bear/bare) room with just a mattress
  • -> I saw a bare room with just a mattress

Question-4

  • It only had (bear/bare) minimum of food.
  • -> It only had bare minimum of food.

Question-5

  • In the autumn the tree was completely (bear/bare).
  • -> In the autumn the tree was completely bare.

Question-6

  • He had the habit of (bear/bare) himself with panache
  • -> He had the habit of bearing himself with panache.

Question-7

  • She managed to (bear/bare) six daughters
  • -> She managed to bore six daughters

Conclusion

So, there you have it. The difference between “bare” vs. “bear”. Let us know if you have any other queries.

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