Adverse vs Averse: What is the Difference? Meaning


Do you know the difference between Adverse vs Averse? In this article, we will learn the meaning of adverse and averse, along with examples & explanations.

Adverse vs Averse: What is the Difference?

Just like I had said, in the previous posts of the series, most of the confusing words are often some of the most frequently used words of the English language. This is why you must understand the meaning of the words carefully along with the correct examples.

In this post, we are going to see the difference between Adverse vs. adverse.

So, let’s get started.

AdverseAverse
It is used to describe effects or events. This word usually has a sense of hostility or harmfulness.This can describe people and means to feel opposed or disinclined.
E.g., Today’s heavily raining is adverse to the situation.E.g., They were not averse to holding another meeting.

What Do Adverse and Averse Mean?

Much like most of the confusing pair of words, these two adjectives adverse and averse are also related. Both of them share the Latin root vert- meaning “to turn.” In Latin, the actual word is adversus which means “turned toward” and “hostile”. This word is the direct root of the word adverse. But for Averse, the actual Latin word is aversus, which means “turned away.”

Today, adverse is very rarely used for people or living beings. Rather it is more frequently used to describe effects or events. This word usually has a sense of hostility or harmfulness. Like you must have heard many phrases such as adverse reviews; adverse winds; and even adverse trends in the economy.

On the other hand, Averse can describe people and means to feel opposed or disinclined. Most of the times, it is paired with a negative word (not) which helps to convey the opposite meaning of the actual word.

Like for example:

They were not averse to holding another meeting.

This word is followed by “to”, and in some other use, it is occasionally followed by “from”.

It also has a related noun which is aversion.

How To Remember and Use Adverse vs Averse Correctly?

Remember that both these words are turn-offs, but adverse is always something harmful, and averse is a strong feeling of dislike.

Like: The Rain has created adverse conditions, and thus most people are averse to rain.

Adverse can also refer to something that works against you. But Averse is meant for feelings, attitudes, or people. This indicates a strong feeling of opposition like we say the phrase “no thanks” to things we don’t like. This word can also describe people (or banks) who don’t like taking them:

When it is a force of nature we can call it adverse but when we remove the “d” it becomes personal and a person can be averse to or against anything, like rainy days or bad cold.

Some Questions and Answers Adverse vs Averse

Question-1

  • The heavy has made the situation (adverse/averse) to victory.
  • -> The heavy rain has made the situation adverse to victory.

Question-2

  • He was not (adverse/averse) to give him another chance.
  • -> He was not averse to give him another chance.

Question-3

  • When the situation is (adverse/averse), we must fight together.
  • -> When the situation is adverse, we must fight together.

Question-4

  • They are not (adverse/averse) to call off the meeting.
  • -> They are not averse to call off the meeting.

Question-5

  • Can you hold off the (adverse/averse) situation?
  • -> Can you hold off the adverse situation?

Conclusion

So, we have a basic idea about Adverse vs. Averse. Let us know if you have any other queries.

Refer to our most interesting articles

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