What are Correlative Conjunctions? Definition, Meaning, Examples, List

Let’s explore Correlative Conjunctions!

What are Correlative Conjunctions? Definition, Meaning, Examples, List

What are correlative conjunctions? Any idea! In this article, we will learn what is correlative conjunction, definition, meaning, examples, sentence examples, list.

Let’s explore!

What are Correlative Conjunctions? Definition

Let’s try to understand the definition of a correlative conjunction,

The conjunctions that are used to connect pairs of words are called correlative conjunctions. They always work in pairs to connect,

  • Words
  • Phrases
  • Clauses
what are correlative conjunctions definition examples list
What are correlative conjunctions definition examples list

Correlative conjunctions are stronger than coordinating conjunctions as they (correlative conjunctions) are used to emphasize the relationship between the ideas being joined.

Correlative Conjunction Examples

Let’s look at a few correlative conjunctions examples with explanations.

Joining Words

Example

  • My aunt is not only a housewife but also a doctor.

Explanation

  • In the above-mentioned sentence, the Conjunctions in italics are the correlative conjunctions and the underlined words are those words that they(correlative conjunctions) have joined.

Joining Phrases

Example

  • All of these shirts are either old-fashioned or worn out.

Explanation

  • In the above-mentioned sentence, the Conjunctions in italics are the correlative conjunctions and the underlined words are those phrases that they(correlative conjunctions) have joined.

Joining Clauses

Example

  • Neither Rohan came nor he brought my books.

Explanation

  • In  the above mentioned sentence, the Conjunctions in italics are the correlative conjunctions and the underlined words are those clauses that they(correlative conjunctions) have joined.

Correlative Conjunctions List

Following are some widely used correlative conjunctions with some examples:

# Either/Or

  • Either he will come to the party or stay at home.
  • Either John cooks food or not.
  • Would you like to have either tea or coffee?
  • Either I or my father will attend the guests
  • It’s either a new dress or the old one.

# Neither/Nor

  • He is neither interested in cooking nor baking.
  • Rohan can neither speak nor write English.
  • I should neither talk to him nor ask him for help.
  • She is neither beautiful nor intelligent.
  • The old man can neither eat nor talk.

# Both/And

  • Both Ram and Sham will go to school.
  • We would like to have both pasta and pizza.
  • They are both tired and hungry after work.
  • Rohan is both intelligent and handsome.
  • I like to play both football and hockey.

# Whether/Or

  • I don’t know whether she will come or not.
  • You will have to do this work whether you like it or not.
  • Ram must obey his parents whether he likes it or not.
  • We will see whether she comes or not.
  • I have to complete my work whether I feel tired or not.

# Not only/But also

  • He not only danced well but also stood first in the competition.
  • She’s not only beautiful but also intelligent.
  • Tame not only speaks English but also he is good at writing English.
  • She not only plays violin but also composes music.
  • The thieves not only took his money but also hit him with a knife.

# Not/But

  • It doesn’t matter how a person dies, but it matters how he lives.
  • I relax not by playing guitar, but by listening to the soothing music.
  • She has not one dress but two.
  • I see you are not in the mood to study dancing but studying.
  • He likes not to visit Mumbai but Ahmedabad.

# As/As

  • You are as smart as your sister.
  • Ram is as good as his father.
  • Your horse runs as fast as my horse.
  • The weather is as bad as last year.
  • Do the work as carefully as you can.

# Such/That

  • The girl asked such a foolish question that everybody laughed at her.
  • John gave a speech with such passion that everybody was forced to listen to him.
  • It was such a joyful day that everyone was happy.
  • It is such an interesting story that I am reading it thrice.
  • Eliza is such a beautiful girl that no one can ignore her.

# Scarcely/When

  • Scarcely had I thought of eating ice cream, when my friend bought it.
  • Scarcely had I reached the airport, when the flight was about to take off.
  • Scarcely had I finished my work, when the deadline had arrived.

# As many/As

  • We have assembled as many marbles as we could.
  • Tame has many pens as I have.
  • I have written as many lines as Gerrard wrote.
  • Ram ate as many candies as he could.

# No sooner/Than

  • Rohan had no sooner arrived than John.
  • Geeta no sooner started cooking than there was a power cut.
  • No sooner had I started walking than it started to rain.
  • No sooner had I switched on the TV, than the light went off.

# Rather/Than

  • We should study hard rather than indulging in social media.
  • You should visit him rather than staying at home.
  • I would rather dance than sitting quietly.
  • I would prefer coffee rather than tea.

# Hardly/When

  • Hardly had I started walking when the rain started.
  • Hardly had I completed my project when the deadline was near.
  • Hardly had I started watching the movie when my mom called me for some work.

# If/Then

  • If I study hard, then I will stand first in my class.
  • If you have checked the list then pass it to the boss.
  • If you are done with your dinner then let’s go out for a walk.
  • If you have completed the project then show me.

# Just as/So

  • Just as I wanted to dance, so Rohan played the music.
  • Just as I wanted to travel by air, so Seeta booked tickets for me.

Important Points for Correlative Conjunctions

Point#1

If an independent clause is used in the second portion of the sentence,  then a comma to be used with correlative conjunctions.  

Since correlative conjunctions are used to pair two parts of a sentence, we only need to use a comma if there are two independent clauses that are paired up or connected with the help of correlative conjunction.

For example

  • Ram likes not only to drive a bike but also to drive a car.

In the above sentence, correlative conjunction is just connecting two prepositional phrases, so no comma is needed.

Another example

  • John not only likes to cook, but he also likes to bake.

In the above sentence, correlative conjunction is connecting independent clauses, so a comma should be used.

Point#2

Avoiding double negative when using Neither/Nor

When you are using Neither/Nor,  don’t use another negative part with it.

For example –

  • He didn’t like neither shirt nor pants.

In the above example, we have used a double negative with Neither/Nor and it is not correct.

Another example

  • Neither he liked shirts nor pants.

The above sentence is a correct sentence.

Point#3

Using correct words according to the Subject/Verb Agreement

Keep in mind the Subject Verb Agreement while using the correlative Conjunctions.

For example

  • Both Rohan and his friends run two miles every day.

In the above sentence, friends are closest to the verb, so “run” should be used in place of “runs”.

Correct sentence

  • Both Rohan and his friends run two miles every day.

Conclusion

Hence, we have got a basic idea about correlative conjunctions, definitions, meaning, many examples, list. Any questions, please let us know!

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