What are Demonstrative Pronouns? Definition, Meaning, Examples, List

Let’s explore Demonstrative Pronouns!

What are Demonstrative Pronouns? Definition, Meaning, Examples, List

What is a demonstrative pronoun? Any idea! In this article, we will learn about demonstrative pronouns, its definition, meaning, examples, explanation, list, etc.

Let’s explore!

What are Demonstrative Pronouns?

Demonstrative Pronoun Definition

The category of pronouns that are used to represent a noun and express its position as near or far are called demonstrative pronouns. Demonstrative pronouns are used to point to some object or persons. They demonstrate something.

They are used to represent or demonstrate things that are-

  • Near in distance or time (this, that)
  • Far in distance or time (these, those)
  • Other than “this, that, these, those”; we also have demonstrative pronouns like-

Such, None, Neither.

Demonstrative Pronoun Examples

For example-

  • This boy is very naughty.
  • I love that house.
  • These mangoes are yummy.
  • Look at those girls.

Rules for Demonstrative Pronouns

Identifying nouns

Demonstrative pronouns can be used to identify or replace the nouns in a sentence.

For example,

  • This is my table.
  • That is my father’s table.
  • Those are tables.
  • These are my grandma’s shoes.

Following verbs

Demonstrative pronouns are followed by linking verbs.

For example-

  • This is a table.
  • That is my father’s table.
  • Those are tables.
  • These are my grandma’s shoes.

Describing places, animals, or things

Demonstrative pronouns can be used to describe places, animals or things.

For example-

  • This is John. (specific person)
  • That is his hometown. (place)
  • Those were my dog’s puppies. (animal)
  • These are my pens. (thing)

Standing alone

Demonstrative pronouns can even stand alone in a sentence.

For example-

  • Don’t do this.
  • Don’t do that.
  • Leave these alone.
  • Leave those alone.

List of Demonstrative Pronouns

This

It’s used to represent near in distance or time things. Also, it’s a singular pronoun.

For example-

  • This is my book.
  • This is so yummy.
  • This is a handsome boy.
  • Have you seen this?
  • This is so good.

That

It’s also used to represent near in distance or time things. It’s also a singular pronoun.

For example-

  • That is her cat.
  • I love that.
  • Stop that.
  • Grab that.
  • I see that.
  • That smells.

These

It’s used to represent far in distance or time things. It’s a plural pronoun.

For example-

  • Look at these, they are so tempting.
  • These are my siblings.
  • These are my two sisters.
  • Are these yours?
  • You will have to show me these.
  • These are delicious.

Those

It’s used to represent far in distance or time things. It’s also a plural pronoun.

For example-

  • Throw those away.
  • Those are mine.
  • Those are beautiful.
  • Those are my pens.
  • Are those yours?

Such

Such can be used both as a singular or plural pronoun.

For example-

  • Such a great way.
  • If such is her way of teaching, students will find it difficult to learn.
  • Such a good look.
  • He is such a good teacher.

None

It can be used both as a singular or plural pronoun.

For example-

  • None of us was happy.
  • None of us enjoyed the movie.
  • None of that type is available.
  • He said that none of the pens was good.

Neither

It’s always a singular demonstrative pronoun because while using it, the verb will always be singular.

For example-

  • Neither of the shoes is good.
  • Neither of the answers is correct.
  • Neither of us visited Chennai.

Demonstrative Pronouns and Adjectives

Demonstrative Pronouns

Demonstrative pronouns are used to replace nouns.

  • They are followed by ‘linking verbs‘.
  • They can also stand alone.
  • They point to the location of objects and people in space and time.
  • They tell where something is.

For example-

  • This is my book.
  • That is my pen.
  • Those mangoes are yummy.
  • These dogs are very dangerous.

Demonstrative Adjectives 

Demonstrative adjectives are always present before nouns.

  • They can’t stand alone in a sentence.
  • They need to be in the same form as nouns either singular or plural.

For example-

  • This pen is mine.
  • That pen is hers.
  • These dogs are cute.
  • Those mangoes are yummy.

Check out demonstrative pronouns worksheets for practice.

Demonstrative Pronouns Characteristics

Demonstrative pronouns can stand alone

It’s not a compulsion that demonstrative pronouns will always be used to replace nouns. They can even stand alone in a sentence.

For example-

  • Fear, not those.
  • That is mine.
  • Those are so good.
  • Look at that.
  • Stop this.

In the above sentences, demonstrative pronouns are present alone in the sentences, i.e. without any objects or nouns.

Make an obvious link to the antecedent while using the demonstrative pronoun

The antecedent of a demonstrative pronoun is always present close to the demonstrative pronoun. It should not be unclear.

Correct Sentence

Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it. (Playwright George Bernard Shaw)

(In the above quote, the antecedent of the demonstrative pronoun- “That” is –

“Liberty means responsibility “.

Incorrect Sentence

Liberty means responsibility. That is what most men dread.

(In the above-mentioned sentence the antecedent of the demonstrative pronoun- “That” is – Liberty means responsibility “. But here in the second sentence word-” what” is used in place of “why”, which makes the sentence unclear. The reader can’t understand if the word points to ‘liberty’ or ‘responsibility.

Small Exercise on Demonstrative Pronouns

Practise Exercise A

Look at the following sentences and fill the blanks with a correct demonstrative pronoun.

  1. _____ is my car.
  2. _____ are my children.
  3. _____ is my car over there.
  4. _____ are my children here.
  5. _____ bike over there is mine.
  6. Do you know _____  boys over there?
  7. Can I use ______ pencil here?
  8. I love _____ pencils here.

Answers:

  1. This
  2. Those
  3. That
  4. These
  5. That
  6. Those
  7. This
  8. These

Practise Exercise B

Look at the following sentences and fill in the correct demonstrative pronoun in the blanks.

  1. _____ bricks over there are mine.
  2. _____ was a great morning.
  3. Look at _____ newspaper.
  4. _____ is my pen.
  5. _____ are my grandparents.
  6. _____ are his grandparents.
  7. Is _____ your mobile phone?
  8. _____ was a great evening.
  9. _____ bricks over there are John’s.
  10. _____ bottle over there is empty.

Answers:

  1. Those
  2. That
  3. This
  4. This
  5. These
  6. Those
  7. That
  8. That
  9. Those
  10. That

Conclusion

Hence, we have learned the basics of demonstrative pronouns, along with basic definitions, examples, list. Any doubt, please write in the below comment box.

Further Study

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